7 Foods That Can Help Clear Brain Fog and Improve Concentration

Brain fog isn’t a medical diagnosis. Rather, a general term to describe the feeling of being mentally spaced out.

What is brain fog?

As mentioned by neuropsychiatrist Dr Rohan Bokdawala, brain fog can appear due to structural damage to the brain – a much more severe condition and requires medical intervention, or the functional impairment of the cognitive ability due to nutrition, stress or lack of sleep [1].

What are the symptoms of brain fog?

Although not an official medical diagnosis, brain fog is characterized as a condition that has symptoms [2] such as:

  • confusion
  • Distractedness and insufficient concentration
  • Forgetfulness and additional memory issues
  • headaches
  • Fuzzy thinking

Your brain and food

Food is the primary source of energy connected to better brain power. A healthy diet can help improve brain function, and may even help with things like dementia [3].

Likewise, a diet deficient in carbs and vitamins – particularly B12 and minerals could also lead to poor functioning of the brain. One of the most-neglected causes of brain fog is the low level of carbohydrates. Carb consumption is essential as the body converts it into glucose, and your brain uses it instantly for energy [4].

Carbs influence the function of the brain in several other ways, such as sending signals to the brain to create serotonin, which is concerned in appetite control, mood regulation and the sleep cycle. It is advised to consume omega-3 fatty acids to maintain focus.

Composed of three fats, ALA, EPA and DHA, omega-3 is an essential fatty acid that must be acquired from dietary sources since the body cannot adequately produce it. DHA and EPA are long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, while ALA is a short-chain omega-3 fatty acid from plant sources, transforming into EPA and DHA in small quantities.

DHA is the one that parts in several critical functions in the brain. Impairment in these processes can lead to deterioration in brain processes. Thus, you don’t just want omega-3 fatty acids but DHA to help improve brain fog. Similarly, omega-3 fatty acids also lower inflammation in the brain.

7 foods that can help with brain fog

Here are seven foods you can try to incorporate into your daily diet to combat brain fog:

Also called “brain-berries”, these can help manage inflammation and oxidative stress in the brain. Flavonoids, a kind of antioxidant, can enhance blood flow and communication between the cells and shield neurons from damage.

Also called "brain-berries"these can help manage inflammation and oxidative stress in the brain

Broccoli is packed with potent plant compounds, including antioxidants. It’s also very high in vitamin K, supplying more than 100 per cent of the RDI (Recommended Daily Intake) in a 1-cup (160-gram) serving of cooked broccoli [5].


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This fat-soluble vitamin is crucial for constructing sphingolipids, a type of fat densely packed into brain cells. Some studies in older adults have linked a more increased Vitamin K intake to better memory and cognitive status.

Beyond Vitamin K, broccoli contains several compounds that give it anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, which may aid protect the brain against damage.

This fat-soluble vitamin is crucial for constructing sphingolipids, a type of fat densely packed into brain cells

If coffee is one of the highlights of your morning, you’ll be pleased to hear it’s good for you. Two main components in coffee, caffeine and antioxidants, can help support brain health.

The caffeine in coffee has some positive effects on the brain, including:

Boosted alertness: it keeps your brain alert by blocking adenosine, a chemical messenger that makes you feel sleepy [6].

Improved mood: it may also boost some of your “feel-good” neurotransmitters, such as dopamine.

Sharpened engagement: a study found that caffeine consumption led to short-term progress in attention and alertness in participants completing a cognition test [7]. In addition, coffee term consumption of coffee term is linked to a lowered risk of diseases like as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. The most significant risk reduction was seen in adults consuming three to four cups daily [8, 9].

Fatty fish like cod liver, herring, mackerel, salmon, sardines or tuna improve attention, as these are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, especially DHA. For vegetarians, avocados work the same way. Rich in omega-3, Vitamins B, D and E, and minerals like iron, magnesium and zinc, avocados help lessen oxidative stress.

Ever wonder why walnuts look like tiny brains? They contain a high DHA concentration, which helps maintain healthy brain function.

Although all nuts are good sources of antioxidants, walnuts rate higher in potency when likened to superfoods like almonds, peanuts, and pistachios.

In addition, they protect the brain tissue from inflammation, supporting it as you age. Even seeds (pumpkin, for example) are useful for this [10].

The most typically overlooked ingredient is water. While the brain might acclimate in the short term, chronic dehydration might lead to a deficit in brain function and lead to the feelings associated with brain fog in the long run. A recent study presented that when a person is dehydrated, the brain needs more effort to complete the task [11].

Curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric that provides the spice its characteristic yellow colour, can support brain health and improve mood and memory function. Recent research shows that curcumin can stimulate the brain hormone BDNF, which can boost and preserve the functioning of neurons.

MitoQ and how it can help

As determined and focused as we can be on ensuring our diets are rich with what we need, supplementing can significantly support to defeat brain fog.

in 1990, MitoQ was introduced at the University of Otago, New Zealand when mitochondrial specialist Professor Mike Murphy and biochemist Professor Robin Smith analyzed mitochondria and tried to crack why antioxidant supplements like CoQ10 were less effective than expected at sustaining health. They discovered that typical antioxidants could not infiltrate the mitochondria even after penetrating the bloodstream.

Thus, they created a multi-patented cellular optimiser Mitoquinol Mesylate. It can penetrate mitochondria and manage free radicals and oxidative damage while providing additive benefits.

The product was developed as the world’s first mitochondria-targeted antioxidant to empower individuals’ health and purposes. MitoQ is uniquely developed to address cell stress, letting you unlock more energy and provide faster recovery and healthier aging and authorizing you to embrace life on your terms.


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What is the science behind MitoQ?

MitoQ has been examined in over 600 independent papers, showing proven benefits to oxidative stress, organ health and more. MitoQ has established encouraging preclinical results in various studies in isolated mitochondria, tissues and cells experiencing oxidative stress and apoptotic death. Over 600 positive peer-reviewed in vitro and preclinical studies covering multiple therapeutic areas have recently been presented.

MitoQ is included in 14 clinical trials as of late. One pointed out that MitoQ enhanced arterial dilation in healthy adults by 42%, indicating that it holds promise for supporting age-related vascular health. Other studies have shown that MitoQ can assist kidney and liver health.

Presently, MitoQ is being further studied in approximately 40 more clinical trials.

The information included in this article is for informational purposes only. The purpose of this webpage is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

[1] https://www.vogue.in/wellness/content/best-foods-to-improve-memory-and-focus-diet-tips
[2] https://www.healthline.com/health/covid-brain-fog#about
[3] https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/what-to-eat-to-reduce-your-risk-of-alzheimers-disease-2020050819774
[4] https://bit.ly/3qrczqP
[5] https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/1103174/nutrients
[6] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4462044/
[7] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28882811/
[8] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26677204
[9] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29167102/
[10] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7071526/
[11] https://www.vogue.in/content/does-coffee-actually-cause-dehydration

Photograph: NDAB Creativity/Shutterstock

The information included in this article is for informational purposes only. The purpose of this webpage is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.