Asian Americans feel less safe in SF than other groups, Chronicle poll finds

Good morning, Bay Area. It’s Wednesday, Sept. 14, and for the first time, California’s tourism bureau is showcasing the state’s tribal lands. Here’s what you need to know to start your day.

Today we share more results from The Chronicle’s SFNext survey, one of the largest and most rigorous citywide polls in decades.

Among the findings are that Asian American residents, who make up more than a third of San Francisco’s, are more pessimistic and critical of the city than other ethnic groups. The results reflect widespread dissatisfaction that helped fuel this year’s recalls of three school board members and District Attorney Chesa Boudin.

Only 14% of the 490 who identified as Asian believe that living in the city will be better in two years, the lowest rate among all ethnic groups and below the overall 22% of 1.653 survey who think the city will improve. Forty-four percent of Asian Americans think the city will be worse in two years, compared to 35% overall.

Respondents include Jade Le, who has lived in the Tenderloin for 11 years and says her beloved neighborhood is in the worst state that she’s ever seen, particularly in terms of safety. Le, who is Vietnamese and Chinese, said she was assaulted four times near her home during the pandemic, and had trash and a racist insult hurled at her.

“I’m afraid to leave my own home,” she said.

More coverage:

• Here’s how many San Franciscans say they’ve been the victim of a crime, according to the poll.

Heather Knight: We asked SF residents what makes them proudest — and saddest — about the city. Their answers are eye-opening.

ICYMI: Here is what polling revealed about residents’ opinions of Mayor London Breed, the Board of Supervisors and the San Francisco Unified school board — and how residents feel about life in the city and its biggest problems.

Methodology: Details about how the survey was conducted are here.

today’s forecast

The cooling trend that started on Monday is set to continue through the weekend and into the early part of next week.

Gerry Diaz / Pivotal Weather

A series of weather systems is cruising through Northern California this week, and newsroom meteorologist Gerry Díaz dives into what they will mean not just for the Bay Area, but for firefighting operations against the Mosquito Fire – including the effects of its smoke on air quality across Northern California and parts of Nevada.

Temperatures today should range from the upper 60s along the coast to around 80 in the inland parts of the East Bay, with highs around 70 expected in San Francisco.

Read the full forecast.

What to eat and drink

Strawberry rhubarb pie from Edith's Pie, which is opening a cafe in Oakland.

Strawberry rhubarb pie from Edith’s Pie, which is opening a cafe in Oakland.

Provided by Adahlia Cole

A Bay Area pop-up that’s built a loyal following for luscious, buttery pies in flavors like fudge banana cream and peanut butter and jelly is opening an all-day cafe in Oakland.

Edith’s Pie is moving into 412 22nd St., at Broadway, where Taiwan Bento recently closed. Co-owners Mike Raskin and Jeffrey Wright plan to open what they describe as their dream combination pie shop and cafe there in early 2023.

Pie will be available all day. Customers will be able to drop by in the mornings for a sausage, egg and cheese hand pie and cup of coffee, or hang out in the afternoon and evenings with a slice of lemon icebox pie and a glass of wine or low-ABV cocktail.

Read more from Elena Kadvany.

• Four Barrel partners and Tartine alum bring new Jewish bakery to SF

• Top Walnut Creek restaurants: Our updated guide to finding stand-out food in the East Bay city, from pizza to Burmese.

Around the Bay

Vendor Efrain Carranza puts his hand to his head as he sells goods in San Francisco, Calif., on Tuesday, Sept.  13, 2022.The police gave him a piece of paper on how to obtain a permit to sell goods.  San Francisco said it will be enforcing the new law that a vendor needs to have a permit.

Vendor Efrain Carranza puts his hand to his head as he sells goods in San Francisco, Calif., on Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022.The police gave him a piece of paper on how to obtain a permit to sell goods. San Francisco said it will be enforcing the new law that a vendor needs to have a permit.

Gabrielle Lurie / The Chronicle

SF . street vending crackdown: Hotspots largely clear on Day 1 of enforcement.

Concern and frustration: SF Mayor Breed responds to Castro merchants’ protest over drugs, homelessness by pledging police help. Also: How much will downtown SF’s struggles hurt the city budget? The supervisor wants to know.

“This is huge”: For the first time, California tourism bureau is encouraging travelers to visit tribal lands.

New SF policy: DA Jenkins may seek charges for 16- and 17-year-olds as adults in some “heinous” cases.

Voters to decide: Bay Area city might ditch ‘fireman’ and other gendered language.

Tax measure: Newsom’s allies support Prop. 30 — here’s why it makes sense that he doesn’t.

aliens or non-citizens? Biden, Trump disagree — and so do judges on the Ninth Circuit.

Public-health setback: HIV infections rose in SF for first time in a decade, perhaps due to pandemic.

• “No idea if this is possible: Bay Area swimmer attempts 27-mile ocean route from SF to Half Moon Bay.

Champion of budget wine dies at 79

Fred Franzia holds a bottle of Charles Shaw chardonnay wine off the bottling line at the Bronco Wine Company facility in Napa, Calif., Tuesday, April 17, 2007.

Fred Franzia holds a bottle of Charles Shaw chardonnay wine off the bottling line at the Bronco Wine Company facility in Napa, Calif., Tuesday, April 17, 2007.

Eric Risberg/AP

Fred Franzia, the California wine magnate best known for creating Two Buck Chuck, died Tuesday at age 79 at home in Stanislaus County, family members confirmed.

Franzia was a lifelong champion of inexpensive wine and critic of California’s elite wine culture, frequently proclaiming that no bottle should cost more than $10. He was outspoken and unabashedly ambitious, building a vast empire of vineyards, production facilities and bottling plants throughout California.

“Who says we’re lower priced? We’re the best price. The others, I think, are overpriced,” Franzia told The Chronicle in 2009, in a characteristic remark.

Franzia was no stranger to controversy. He pleaded guilty to fraud charges in 1994 after falsifying the grape varieties on his wine labels. He campaigned — unsuccessfully — for the right to put “Napa” on the labels of wines grown and produced in the Central Valley. But those bumps never seemed to shake Franzia’s confidence in his lifelong mission.

Read more from Esther Mobley.

• Jean-Luc Godard, iconic French New Wave director, dies at 91.

Mr. Briefing is written by Kellie Hwang and Anna Buchmann and sent to readers’ email inboxes on weekday mornings. Sign up for the newsletter here, and contact the writers at kellie.hwang@sfchronicle.com and anna.buchmann@sfchronicle.com.