How did the obesity epidemic happen?

THERE’S NO SIMPLE ANSWER. YEAH, IT’S A PERFECT STORM OF YOU KNOW, A LOT OF REALLY BAD FACTORS THAT HAVE GOTTEN US HERE FACTORS LIKE BIG PLATES BIG PORTIONS BIG ADVERTISING FOOD IS EVERYWHERE IN OUR SOCIETY. WE EAT IT WHEN WE ARE SAD BEAT IT WHEN WE ARE HAPPY AND WE EAT IT WHEN WE HAVE NOTHING TO DO. SO THAT’S OUR WHOLE CULTURE IS CIRCLED AROUND. I MEAN HOW MANY FOOD CHANNELS ON TV WE HAVE FOOD IS UBIQUITOUS. IT’S EVERYWHERE. YOU LOOK WHEN I WAS YOUNG THAT THE ONLY THING THAT A GAS STATION HAD WAS A GUM MACHINE NOW, THERE ARE SODAS CANDY CHIPS RIGHT AT YOUR FINGERTIPS GROCERY STORES HAVE CHANGED TOO IN THE 1970S THERE WERE ANYWHERE FROM 10 TO 15,000 PRODUCTSKET NOW A SU THE SUPERMARKET SIZES HAVE GOTTEN MUCH BIGGER AND YOU’RE TALKING ANYWHERE FROM 50 TO 80,000 PRODUCTS. THOSE ARE NOT BETTER VARIETIES OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLES. USUALLY IT HAS MORE TO DO WITH PROCESSED FOOD A PROCESSED FOOD IS ANY FOOD THAT HAS BEEN ALTERED IN SOME WAY DURING PREPARATION NOT ALL ARE UNHEALTHY THIS MILK FOR EXAMPLE IS PROCESSED BUT MANY CONTAIN A LOT OF SALT SUGAR AND FATON TO MAKE IT LAST L TASTE BETTER. IT’S WIDELY AVAILABLE. IT’S INEXPENSIVE. TASTES REALLY GOOD. IT’S DESIGNED TO MAKE PEOPLE OVERWEIGHT. ALTHOUGH THAT’S NOT THE INTENT, BUT THAT’S THE CONSEQUENCE IF YOU DOUBT THAT CONSIDER A STUDY BY THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF HEALTH FOR TWO WEEKS. GROUP EIGHT HIGHLY PROCESSED FOOD ANOTHER GROUP ATE UNPROCESSED FOOD OVER THOSE TWO WEEKS THE PROCESSED FOOD GROUP GAINED TWO POUNDS THE NON-PROCESSED FOOD GROUP LOST TWO POUNDS. BUT THE REALITY IS A RELIANCE ON THE QUICK AND EASY MEAL IS LIKELY HERE TO STAY PEOPLE. CLICKING A LOT LESS AND SO PEOPLE ARE LOOKING FOR CONVENIENCE FOODS, AND THEY THINK WE HAVE TO REALIZE that THAT IS KIND OF THE NEW NORM PEOPLE ARE SPENDING LESS TIME COOKING EVEN IF YOU WANT TO COOK FROM SCRATCH RAW HEALTHY FOOD CAN BE EXPENS YOU CAN LITERALLY FEED TERRIBLY YOUR FAMILY FOR TWENTY DOLLARS IF YOU WANT TO JUST GIVE THEM JUNK FOOD. BUT TO DO IT PROPERLY IS IT’S A FAMILY OF THREE EAT A HEALTHY MEAL. COST LIKE IT CAN GET EXORBITANT. COSTLY AND HARD TO COME BY IN SOME POOR NEIGHBORHOODS WHERE REGULAR GROCERY STORES ARE NON-EXISTENT. AND THAT’S A PROBLEM. THAT’S HARD TO FIX. IT’S NOT REALISTIC TO THINK WE’RE GOING TO HAVE, YOU KNOW, BIG BRICK AND MORTAR PROJECTS COMING INTO A LOT OF NEIGHBORHOODS. MOST CHAINS ARE NOT LOOKING TO BUILD MORE STORES. IT IS A IT’S A VERY HIGH RISK VENTURE AND IT IS NOT EASY TO DO THAT IN ANY AREA LET ALONE IN LOWER INCOME NEIGHBORHOODS WHERE MAYBE THE THE CHANCES OF RECOUPING YOUR COSTS ARE LESS. IT’S A VERY SMALL PROFIT MARGIN INDUSTRY AND WHILE WE’RE EATING MORE PROCESSED FOODS MORE OFTEN. WE’RE MOVING MUCH LESS. WE SEE THAT THERE’S A LOT LESS PHYSICAL ACTIVITY STUDENTS DON’T NECESSARILY HAVE TO HAVE RECESS ANYMORE COMING THROUGH. WE’RE MUCH MORE SEDENTARY. WE DON’T HAVE PHYSICAL JOBS THE WAY WE USED TO KNOW YOU DON’T EVEN GO TO GROCERY STORE. WE JUST ORDER IT. I DON’T KNOW NEXT THING. WHAT IS NEXT SOMEBODY’S GONNA PUT FOOD IN OUR MOUTH. THAT WOULD BE AWESOME. RIGHT WHO WILL HAVE TO DO ANYTHING. JUST CHILL. MINDY BECERRA WBAL TV 11 NEWS ALRIGHT, SO SOME OF THE SOLUTIONS THAT HAVE SHOWN SOME SUCCESS INCLUDE MONETARY INCENTIVES FOR FOOD STAMP RECIPIENTS TO PURCHASE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES AS WELL AS TAXING SUGARY BEVERAGES AND CREATI SODA

Weight of the Nation: How did the obesity epidemic happen? (Parts 3 of 5)

Factors like big plates, big portions and big advertising, putting food is everywhere in American society, helped contribute to the obesity epidemic.” It’s a perfect storm of really bad factors that have gotten us here, and it’s going to take us a lot of time to get us out of this situation,” said Anne Palmer, program director of food communities and public health at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future.”We eat when we’re sad, we eat when we’re happy, and we eat when we have nothing to do. Our whole culture is circled around it. I mean, how many food channels on TV do we have?” said Dr. Kuldeep Singh, director of the Maryland Bariatric Center.”Food is ubiquitous, it’s everywhere you look. When I was a kid, the only thing a gas station had was a gum machine,” said Dr. Bill Dietz, director of the STOP Obesity Alliance.Now, there are sodas, candy and chips right at your fingertips at stores and vending machines. Grocery stores have changed, too.”In the 1970s, there were anywhere from 10,000 to 15,000 products in a supermarket. Now, the supermarket sizes have gotten much bigger. There’s anywhere from 50,000 to 80,000 products. These are not better varieties of fruits and fruits vegetables. Usually, it has to do with processed foods,” Palmer said.Processed food is any food that has been altered in some way during preparation. Not all are unhealthy. For example, some milk is processed, but many contain a lot of salt, sugar and fat to make it last longer and taste better.” It’s widely available, it’s inexpensive and it tastes really good. It’s designed to make people overweight. That’s not the intent, but that’s the consequence,” Dietz said.A study by the National Institutes of Health observed one group of people who ate highly processed food and another group who ate an unprocessed diet. Over two weeks, the processed food group gained two pounds and the unprocessed group lost two pounds.But the reality is society’s reliance on a quick-and-easy meal is likely here to stay.”People have been cooking a lot less. So, people are looking for convenience foods. We have to realize that that is kind of the new norm, people are spending less time cooking,” Palmer said.Even for people who want to cook from scratch, raw and healthy food can be expensive.” You can feed terribly your family for $20 if you want to just give them junk food. A family of three to eat a healthy meal, it’s exorbitant,” said Jon Jones, who lost 100 pounds.Eating healthy can be costly and hard to come by in some poorer neighborhoods, where regular grocery stores are non-existent — and that’s a problem that’s hard to fix.”I think it’s not realistic to think we’re going to have big brick-and-mortar projects coming into a lot most chains are not looking to build more stores. isk venture. It’s not easy to do that in any area, let alone in lower-income neighborhoods. The chance of recouping your costs are less. It’s a very small profit margin industry,” Palmer said.While people are eating more processed foods more often, people are also much less active.”We see that there’s a lot less physical activity. Students don’t necessarily have to have recess anymore,” Palmer said. “We’re much more sedentary. We don’t have physical jobs the way we used to.””Now, we don’t even go to the grocery store, we just order it. What is next? Somebody’s going to put food in our mouth? That would be awesome, right? You don’t have to do anything, just chew,” Singh said.Some of the solutions that have shown some success include monetary incentives for food stamp recipients to purchase fruits and vegetables, as well as taxing sugary beverages like soda and creating more green space for recreation.

Factors like big plates, big portions and big advertising, putting food is everywhere in American society, helped contribute to the obesity epidemic.

“It’s a perfect storm of really bad factors that have gotten us here, and it’s going to take us a lot of time to get us out of this situation,” said Anne Palmer, program director of food communities and public health at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future.

“We eat when we’re sad, we eat when we’re happy, and we eat when we have nothing to do. Our whole culture is circled around it. I mean, how many food channels on TV do we have?” said Dr. Kuldeep Singh, director of the Maryland Bariatric Center.

“Food is ubiquitous, it’s everywhere you look. When I was a kid, the only thing a gas station had was a gum machine,” said Dr. Bill Dietz, director of the STOP Obesity Alliance.

Now, there are sodas, candy and chips right at your fingertips at stores and vending machines. Grocery stores have changed, too.

“In the 1970s, there were anywhere from 10,000 to 15,000 products in a supermarket. Now, the supermarket sizes have gotten much bigger. There’s anywhere from 50,000 to 80,000 products. These are not better varieties of fruits and vegetables. Usually, it has to do with processed foods,” Palmer said.

Processed food is any food that has been altered in some way during preparation. Not all are unhealthy. For example, some milk is processed, but many contain a lot of salt, sugar and fat to make it last longer and taste better.

“It’s widely available, it’s inexpensive and it tastes really good. It’s designed to make people overweight. That’s not the intent, but that’s the consequence,” Dietz said.

A study by the National Institutes of Health observed one group of people who ate highly processed food and another group who ate an unprocessed diet. Over two weeks, the processed food group gained two pounds and the unprocessed group lost two pounds.

But the reality is society’s reliance on a quick-and-easy meal is likely here to stay.

“People have been cooking a lot less. So, people are looking for convenience foods. We have to realize that that is kind of the new norm, people are spending less time cooking,” Palmer said.

Even for people who want to cook from scratch, raw and healthy food can be expensive.

“You can feed terribly your family for $20 if you want to just give them junk food. A family of three to eat a healthy meal, it’s exorbitant,” said Jon Jones, who lost 100 pounds.

Eating healthy can be costly and hard to come by in some poorer neighborhoods, where regular grocery stores are non-existent — and that’s a problem that’s hard to fix.

“I think it’s not realistic to think we’re going to have big brick-and-mortar projects coming into a lot of neighborhoods. Most chains are not looking to build more stores. It’s a very high-risk venture. It’s not easy to do that in any area, let alone in lower-income neighborhoods. The chance of recouping your costs are less. It’s a very small profit margin industry,” Palmer said.

While people are eating more processed foods more often, people are also much less active.

“We see that there’s a lot less physical activity. Students don’t necessarily have to have recess anymore,” Palmer said. “We’re much more sedentary. We don’t have physical jobs the way we used to.”

“Now, we don’t even go to the grocery store, we just order it. What is next? Somebody’s going to put food in our mouth? That would be awesome, right? You don’t have to do anything, just chew ,” Singh said.

Some of the solutions that have shown some success include monetary incentives for food stamp recipients to purchase fruits and vegetables, as well as taxing sugary beverages like soda and creating more green space for recreation.

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